RENOIR

Remote Equatorial Nighttime Observatory for Ionospheric Regions

Lead Scientist: Prof. Jonathan Makela
Organization: University of Illinois, USA
Objective: Study the equatorial/low-latitude ionosphere/thermosphere system, its response to storms, and the irregularities that can be present on a daily basis.

A suite of instruments dedicated to studying the equatorial/low-latitude ionosphere/thermosphere system, its response to storms, and the irregularities that can be present on a daily basis.

A RENOIR station can involve:

  1. an array of single frequency GPS scintillation monitors. These provide measurements of the irregularities present, their size, orientation, and speed.
  2. a dual-frequency GPS receiver. This provides measurements of the total electron content of the ionosphere. If a site could be located that already fields a dual-frequency GPS receiver, this would not be needed.
  3. an all-sky imaging system (PICASSO). This measures two different thermosphere/ionosphere emissions from which the two-dimensional structure/motion of irregularities can be observed. The data can also be used to calculate the density and height of the ionosphere.
  4. two miniaturized Fabry-Perot interferometers (MiniME). These provide measurements of the thermospheric neutral winds and temperatures. The two FPIs are separated by approximately 300km or so, allowing bistatic, common-volume measurements. The measurements will be useful for studying the response of the thermosphere to storms as well as looking for a possible connection of gravity waves to the seeding of equatorial instabilities.

For more go to the Home Page of "The Airglow & Irregularities Research Group"